Category: Blogs

kihaps

Kihaps

Kihaps in ITF Patterns

Kihaps in ITF patterns

Kihaps appear in various steps in ITF Patterns. This guide is to assist you in remembering which steps or techniques have a Kihap associated with them.

The Kihap literally means to shout or yell. Kihaps are performed to assist the performer focus their concentration and energy into the impact point of the techniques.

Kihaps are also great for Taekwon-Do demonstrations, to create a level of atmosphere and excitement for participants and spectators alike.

Chon- Ji

Chon Ji 17 Kihaps

(Step 17) Move the right foot to D forming a right walking stance toward D while executing a middle punch to D with the right fist.

 

Dan-Gun 

dan Gun 8 Kihaps

(Step 8) Move the right foot to D forming a right walking stance toward D while executing a high punch to D with the right fist.

dan Gun 17 Kihaps

(Step 17) Move the right foot to C forming a right walking stance toward C, at the same time executing a rising block with the right forearm.

 

Do-San

Do San 6 Kihaps

(Step 6) Move the right foot to D forming a right walking stance toward D while executing a middle thrust to D with the right straight fingertip.

Do San 22 Kihaps

(Step 22) Move the right foot to C forming a right walking stance toward C while executing a rising block with the right forearm.

 

Won-Hyo

Won Hyo 12 Kihaps

(Step 12) Move the right foot to D forming a right walking stance toward D while executing a middle thrust to D with the right straight finger tip.

 

Yul Gok

Yul Gok 24 Kihaps

(Step 24) Lower the left foot to D forming a left walking stance toward D while striking the left palm with the right front elbow.

Yul Gok 27 Kihaps

(Step 27) Lower the right foot to C forming a right walking stance toward C while striking the right palm with the left front elbow.

Yul Gok 36 Kihaps

(Step 36) Jump to C forming a left X-stance toward B while executing a high side strike to C with the left back fist.

 

Joong-Gun

Joong Gun 12 Kihaps

(Step 12) Move the right foot to D forming a right walking stance toward D while executing an upset punch to D with a twin fist

 

Toi-Gye

Toi Gye 29 Kihaps

(Step 29) Jump to C forming a right X-stance toward A while executing a pressing block with an X-fist.

 

Hwa-Rang

Hwarang 14 Kihaps

(Step 14) Move the right foot to D forming a right walking stance toward D at the same time executing a middle punch to D with the right fist.

Hwarang 25 Kihaps

(Step 25) Move the right foot to C in a sliding motion forming a right L-stance toward D while thrusting to C with the right side elbow.

 

Choong-Moo

Choong Moo 9 Kihaps

(Step 9) Execute a flying side piercing kick to D with the right foot soon after moving it to D and then land to D forming a left L-stance toward D while executing a middle guarding block to D with a knife-hand.

 

Kwang-Gae

Kwang GAe 23 Kihaps

(Step 23) Move the right foot to D in a stamping motion to form a sitting stance toward F while executing a high side strike to D with the right back fist.

Kwang GAe 27 Kihaps

(Step 27) Move the left foot on lone CD in a stamping motion to form a sitting stance toward F while executing a high side strike to C with the left back fist.

 

Po-Eun

Po eun 12 Kihaps

(Step 12) Execute a right horizontal punch to A while maintaining a sitting stance toward D. Perform 6 through 12 in a fast motion.

Po eun 30 Kihaps

(Step 30) Execute a left horizontal punch to B while maintaining a sitting stance toward D. Perform 24 through 30 in a fast motion.

 

Ge-Baek

Ge BAek 19 Kihaps

(Step 19) Move the left foot to D turning counter clockwise to form a right L-stance toward D while executing a middle guarding block to D with a knife-hand

Ge BAek 28 Kihaps

(Step 28) Jump to D, forming a right x-stance toward BD while executing a high block to D with the right double forearm.

 

 

 

Subscribe to our YouTube channel to see all the patterns and more

Subscribe

general choi hong hi seminar

Umpiring Patterns

Umpiring Patterns

united itf umpiring

National Umpire Course Notes

Umpiring Patterns

These are some recommended guidelines for Umpiring Patterns competitions, for domestic and local events based on the ITF Tournament Rules.

Note : The ‘Official’ ITF Rules are only applicable to ITF World Championships, and as such much of it is not relevant to in-house, local, state and national level competitions.

A National Organization, or any competition for that matter, should adopt rules that are specific to:

  • the event/s being conducted.
  • the ages of participants
  • the experience levels of participants
  • the objective of the competition
  • the facilities being used
  • the schedule / time available
  • the umpires/officials available

Purpose of the ITF Umpiring Rules

  • Clarify responsibilities of officials
  • Outline scoring criteria for each event
  • Determine eligibility of competitors
  • Outline operational procedures of all events
  • Assist competitors and coaches in event preparation
  • Ensure the safety of all competitors and officials

Characteristics of a good Umpire:

  • Be consistent and fair in all judgements
  • Base all decisions on the Rules of the competition
  • Be assertive and confident in all decisions
  • Display Punctuality and work ethic
  • Be professional in appearance and behaviour
  • Be willing to receive constructive feedback and advice from Tournament Directors
  • Have a thorough knowledge of the rules – updated regularly
  • Integrity, honesty and strength of character
  • Ability to follow instructions
  • To be flexible and adaptable in various official roles
  • Some appreciation and empathy of the competitor’s task
  • Ability to make logical, correct decisions quickly and under pressure
    • Do not engage spectators or competitors while judging.
    • have a basic knowledge of First Aid
    • You must be conversant with all patterns / techniques you are to judge

ITF Umpiring uniform consists of

  • a navy blue blazer jacket,
  • white, long sleeved shirt,
  • navy blue trousers or knee-high skirt
  • navy blue tie (with no other colours or decorations- I.T.F. logo permitted)
  • white socks
  • white gym/Taekwon-do shoes

Alternatively, polo tops may be used where a sponsorship arrangement is in place, or approved by the National Organization.

The Competition area –  Patterns

Patterns Ring size should be 9m by 9m square of competition space.

  • Patterns  judges are positioned across the front of the ring.
  • The official Jury table is positioned behind judges
  • There should be adequate distance between the competition area and spectators for safety and integrity of judging
  • Judges should be positioned a safe distance from competition area

BOUT PROCEDURE

The pyramid system of elimination is generally used for both team and individual at Black Belt Levels

Other formats are at the Tournament Organizers discretion, but must be made clear prior to event registration.

ITF patterns

Individual

  • Competitors will compete 1 to 1 and will perform simultaneously one (1) optional Pattern and one (1) designated Pattern (appropriate to their degree), selected at random by the Jury President.
  • The boxes containing the names of the optional patterns will be taken out of the basket by the Jury President before choosing the designated pattern. The winning competitor will progress to the next round.

Umpiring Patterns Team

Team

  • Designated pattern draw will take place whilst both teams are on the floor.
    From the second round of the draw a coin will be tossed to decide which team goes first. The winning coach of the toss decides which team performs as first.
  • The first team will perform 2 patterns and the second team will do likewise.
  • The winning team will progress to the next round.

Team Patterns additional Guidelines 

         The team may line up in any format they choose and team members may perform movements individually, or together, as they choose, but it must be seen to be teamwork.

For example: one team member may not perform moves of the Pattern on his own without the other team members following in unison

Scoring Method:

Patterns are Judged according to the following criteria:

Technical Content    (5 points)

Power                         (5 points)

Rhythm                      (5 points)

  • Team Patterns are also Judged on Teamwork (5 points)

TECHNICAL CONTENT (5 POINTS)

 Technical Content refers to:

  • Correct pattern diagram, all steps performed
  • Appropriate start and finish positions
  • Appropriate posture and facing
  • Techniques performed at correct height and direction of travel
  • Proper tool used for blocking, striking or kicking
  • Correct Stance dimensions and weight distributions
  • Correct use of sine wave
  • Correct stepping, pivoting and turning
  • Maintaining equilibrium whilst stepping, turning and pivoting
  • Remaining stable whilst kicking, including slow movements
  • Control of body weight and momentum
  • Kihaps performed in appropriate places
    • incorrect ready stance (-1)
    • break in pattern sequence but continue within 3 secs (-2)
    • (-1 for Technical Content and -1 for Rhythm(see below))
    • absence of Kihups in patterns (-1)
    • if a movement is performed incorrectly, either once or throughout pattern (-1)
    • incorrect Name of Pattern called at completion of pattern (-1)
    • 3 wrong movements performed in the pattern (0 points)
    • stop pattern completely without resuming within 3 secs (0)
    • wrong pattern performed (0)
    • missing technique in pattern (0) points

 

RHYTHM (5 POINTS)     

Rhythm refers to:

  • Timing of the pattern movements in accordance with encyclopaedia recommendations
  • Absence of delayed pauses, or irregular sequences
  • Pattern completed from start to finish in one continuous sequence
    • Performing the pattern too fast (-1)
    • Irregular sequences or pauses (-1)
    • break in pattern sequence but continue within 3 secs (-2) (-1 for Rhythm and -1 for Technical Content(see above)

POWER (5 POINTS)

Power refers to:

  • Correct application of sine wave
  • Use of reaction arm
  • Appropriate utilization of larger muscle groups, and transfer of body weight
  • Acceleration of movements
  • The appropriate use of breath for each movement
  • Correct strength and timing of breath
    • lack of power (-1)
    • lack of reaction force (-1)
    • no acceleration of movement (-1)
    • uncontrolled stop power (-1)

All patterns are judged according to the recommendations of the Founder of Taekwon-Do, General Choi Hong Hi, along with updates made by the International Taekwondo Federation.

Central Umpire (Patterns)

Responsibilities

  •            Control the procedure of the bout
  •             Ensure competitors abide by the competition rules
  •             Allocated penalties where appropriate
  •             Communicate with Jury President
  •             Clearly signal all decisions to judges.

Patterns – Umpire Terminology

CHARYOT – ATTENTION

KYONG YE – BOW

JUNBI – READY

SIJAK – BEGIN

BARO – RETURN

JU UI – WARNING

HONG – RED

CHONG – BLUE

DONG CHON – TIE

SUNG – WINNER

PATTERNS JUDGES

Responsibilities:

  • To score the bout according to official scoring criteria
  • To have a thorough knowledge of technique / patterns
  • To record and tally scores precisely
  • To be consistent and non-biased in scoring

During the bout:

  • the Corner Referee must be up to date with all the I.T.F. Tournament Rules
  • sit properly and must observe with attention the competitors’ actions 

Jury President

 Responsibilities

Oversee the procedure of the bout

  •  Ensure competitors abide by the competition rules
  •  Communicate with Tournament Organizing Committee
  •  Monitor performance of judges and referees – provide feedback 
  • Scrutinize score sheets and then announce results to Centre Umpire
  • Consult with the Tournament director in regards any appeals

DISQUALIFICATION

  •  misconduct against officials or ignoring instructions
  • any behaviour deemed to be unsporting, offensive, or not in the spirit of fair competition
  • any competitor suspected of being under influence of alcoholic beverages or drugs

Active Participants in this course will be issued a C-Class ITF Umpire Certificate.

This level is issued by the National Organization.

Importantly, regardless of your certified level, you must possess the skills and confidence to effectively control and officiate ITF competitive matches in all events

 

ITF Umpiring Michael Muleta

written by Master Michael Muleta, 8th Degree

ITF Umpire Committee Member 2002-2014

Awarded ‘Outstanding Umpire, 2007 ITF World Championships

President & Technical Director, United ITF Taekwon-Do Australia

tournaments

ITF Umpiring Roles Sparring

ITF Umpiring Roles and Responsibilities

united itf umpiring

National Umpire Course Notes

SPARRING

These are some recommended ITF Umpiring guidelines used in planning and holding domestic competitions, based on the ITF Tournament Rules.

Note : The ‘Official’ ITF Rules are only applicable to ITF World Championships, and as such much of it is not relevant to in-house, local, state and national level competitions.

A National Organization, or any competition for that matter, should adopt rules that are specific to:

  • the event/s being conducted.
  • the ages of participants
  • the experience levels of participants
  • the objective of the competition
  • the facilities being used
  • the schedule / time available
  • the umpires/officials available

Purpose of the ITF Umpiring Rules

  • Clarify responsibilities of officials
  • Outline scoring criteria for each event
  • Determine eligibility of competitors
  • Outline operational procedures of all events
  • Assist competitors and coaches in event preparation
  • Ensure the safety of all competitors and officials

Characteristics of a good Umpire:

  • Be consistent and fair in all judgements
  • Base all decisions on the Rules of the competition
  • Be assertive and confident in all decisions
  • Display Punctuality and work ethic
  • Be professional in appearance and behaviour
  • Be willing to receive constructive feedback and advice from Tournament Directors
  • Have a thorough knowledge of the rules – updated regularly
  • Integrity, honesty and strength of character
  • Ability to follow instructions
  • To be flexible and adaptable in various official roles
  • Some appreciation and empathy of the competitor’s task
  • Ability to make logical, correct decisions quickly and under pressure
    • Do not engage spectators or competitors while judging.
    • have a basic knowledge of First Aid
    • You must be conversant with all patterns / techniques you are to judge

ITF Umpiring uniform consists of

  • a navy blue blazer jacket,
  • white, long sleeved shirt,
  • navy blue trousers or knee-high skirt
  • navy blue tie (with no other colours or decorations- I.T.F. logo permitted)
  • white socks
  • white gym/Taekwon-do shoes

Alternatively, polo tops may be used where a sponsorship arrangement is in place, or approved by the National Organization.

The Competition area –  Sparring

Ring size should be 7m by 7m square of competition space.

  • There should be at least a 1m safety perimeter (total matted area min. 9x9m).
  • Sparring judges are positioned at each corner.
  • The official Jury table is positioned at the front of the ring
  • There should be adequate distance between the competition area and spectators for safety and integrity of judging
  • Judges should be positioned a safe distance from competition area

Bout Duration

Adults

  • Individual elimination and final bouts will be two (2) rounds of two (2) minutes duration with a one (1) minute break between rounds.
  • In the event of a draw, an additional round of one (1) minute will be contested.
  • In the event of another draw, a ‘first point wins’ scenario will occur, which has no time limit.
  • Each team bout will be one (1) round of two (2) minutes.

Bout lengths for younger / older categories are at the discretion of the Tournament Organizers.

Bout Procedure

 INDIVIDUAL SPARRING

  •  Competitors will commence the bout on the start positions
  • At the command of the Centre Referee the competitors bow in turn to the Jury table, and then
  • to each other.
  • The Centre Referee will then start the Sparring with the command “SHI-JAK” and the competitors
  • continue to spar until the Referee issues the command “HAECHYO”.
  • At this point the competitors cease to spar and remain where they are until restarted.

Central Umpire (Sparring)

ITF Umpiring Michael Muleta

Responsibilities

  •            Control the procedure of the bout
  •             Ensure competitors abide by the competition rules
  •             Allocated penalties where appropriate
  •             Communicate with Jury President
  •             Clearly signal all decisions to judges.

Sparring – Referee Terminology

CHARYOT – ATTENTION

KYONG YE – BOW

JUNBI – READY

SIJAK – BEGIN

HAECHYO – SEPARATE

GAESOK – CONTINUE

GOMAN – END

JU UI – WARNING

GAM JUM – DEDUCTING PO1NTS

SIL KYUK – DISQUALIFICATION

HONG – RED

CHONG – BLUE

DONG CHON – TIE

IL BUNYON – FIRST ROUND

YI BUNYON – SECOND ROUND

JUNG JI – TIME STOPPED

SUNG – WINNER

WARNINGS

Warnings will be assigned for the following offences

  • attack to an illegal target
  • stepping completely out of the ring (both feet)
  • falling down, whether intentional or not (this means any part of the body, other than the feet, touching the ground)
  • holding/grabbing/pushing
  • sweeping
  • faking a blow, pretending to be injured to gain an advantage
  • intentionally avoiding sparring
  • pretending to have scored a point by raising the arm

NB If an athlete is pushed out of the ring with intent (without undergoing a technique) then he will not receive a warning

Note: Any 3 cumulative warnings results in a deduction of 1 point (NOT a foul)

FOULS

A Foul results in 1 Minus point, and will be awarded for

  • excessive contact
  • loss of temper
  • insulting an opponent in any way
  • biting/scratching
  • attacking with knee/elbow/forehead
  • attacking a fallen opponent
  • attacking to an illegal target with contact
  • excessive or uncontrolled attack
  • continuing to attack after Umpire’s command of Haechyo

Corner Judging

 

Responsibilities:

  • To score the bout according to official scoring criteria
  • To have a thorough knowledge of technique 
  • To record and tally scores precisely
  • To be consistent and non-biased in scoring

During the bout:

  • the Corner Referee must be up to date with all the I.T.F. Tournament Rules
  • sit properly and must observe with attention the competitors’ actions record point(s), foul(s) and warning(s)

 At the end of the match:

  • the Corner Referee must deduct one (1) point from the total score for every three (3) warnings
  • deduct one (1) point for each Foul

 TARGET AREAS

  • Head and neck area at the front and sides but not at the back
  • Trunk of the body from neck to navel vertically and from a line drawn from the armpit vertically down to the waist on each side (that is frontal area only excluding the back).

SCORING PROCEDURE

In competition a technique is valid when:

  • it is executed correctly
  • it is dynamic, that is to say it is delivered with strength, purpose, rapidity and precision
  • it is controlled on the target
  • contact is made with a legal attacking tool
  • contact is made to a legal target area

POINTS AWARDED

One (1) point will be awarded for:

  • Hand attack directed to mid or high section.
  • Foot attack directed to the mid section

Two (2) points will be awarded for:

  • hand attack while in air (both feet must be off the ground) directed to high section,
  • jumping or flying kick directed to mid section
  • Foot attack directed to high section,

Three (3) points will be awarded for:

  • jumping or flying kick directed to high section

What to score:              

  • A single precise blow to an open target.
  • Score only what you see, not what you think you see or hear
  • Do not be influenced by crowd or competitor’s reactions or suggestions

Jury President

 Responsibilities

Oversee the procedure of the bout

  •  Ensure competitors abide by the competition rules
  •  Communicate with Tournament Organizing Committee
  •  Monitor performance of judges and referees – provide feedback 
  • Scrutinize score sheets and then announce results to Centre Umpire
  • Consult with the Tournament director in regards any appeals

DISQUALIFICATION

  •  misconduct against officials or ignoring instructions
  • any behaviour deemed to be unsporting, offensive, or not in the spirit of fair competition
  • heavy contact
  • committing any 3 fouls 
  • any competitor suspected of being under influence of alcoholic beverages or drugs

INJURY

  • all competitions MUST have a designated and qualified First Aid officer
  • when a competitor is injured, the Centre Referee must stop the match and call for First Aid. (The injury to be diagnosed, treated and the Medic to decide about the match continuation)
  • when a competitor cannot fight on because of the Medic’s decision:
    • he/she is the winner if his opponent is responsible
    • he/she is the loser if his opponent is not responsible
  • an injured competitor that is unfit to fight, according to the Medic’s decision, cannot fight again during the event
  • a competitor that refuses to accept the Medic’s decision will be disqualified
  • if two competitors injure themselves at the same time and both are unfit to fight, according to the Medic’s decision, the winner is the contender that has more scored points at that moment. If the competitors are even the Jury President will decide about the bout

 

Active Participants in this course will be issued a C-Class ITF Umpire Certificate.

This level is issued by the National Organization.

Importantly, regardless of your certified level, you must possess the skills and confidence to effectively control and officiate ITF competitive matches in all events

 

written by Master Michael Muleta, 8th Degree

ITF Umpire Committee Member 2002-2014

Awarded ‘Outstanding Umpire, 2007 ITF World Championships

President & Technical Director, United ITF Taekwon-Do Australia

blog page

ITFTAEKWONDO website wins best Blogs award

ITFTAEKWONDO website wins Best Taekwon-Do Blogs award

ITFTAEKWONDO

Our blog page at itftaekwondo .com has been reviewed and awarded as one of the best taekwondo blogs out there.

 The itftaekwondo.com website was analyzed based on content quality, authenticity factors, uniqueness, data security and a bunch of other aspects throughout the last weeks.

Those blogs that were considered as most reliable and trustworthy were among 20 shortlisted.

We are delighted to have received the recognition and award. We are pleased that people find our articles useful and informative.

For those people who haven’t checked out or blogs, visit our blog page here:

ITFTAEKWONDO BLOG PAGE

Topics include articles on:

  • Respect in Taekwon-Do
  • Ethics in Taekwon-Do
  • The ups and down of sine wave
  • Injuries in Taekwon-D0
  • Close Range Taekwon-Do

 

All our blogs are written by Master Michael Muleta, but we are keen to have input from other interested Taekwon-Do / Martial Arts blog writers.

Master Muleta has an extensive Taekwon-Do CV, having been an International competitor, coach, umpire and administrator. Having taught seminars in almost 20 countries and all over Australasia for close to 30 years, he is highly regarded for his insightful and informative approach.

With a career spanning over 30 years as both a Senior Physical Education teacher and Fitness Industry Education leader, Master Muleta is well versed to write on all matters of Martial Arts.

We also have links to non-Taekwondo related blogs from our partner site, Global Fitness Institute

GLOBAL FITNESS INSTITUTE BLOG PAGE

Get Qualified – Why Martial Arts Instructors need First Aid training

Get Qualified

Why Martial Arts Instructors need to be First Aid qualified

get qualified

As a martial arts instructor it is vital that you do a recognized first aid course, and get qualified, so that you are prepared for any eventuality when working with students.

Whether you’re in the dojang or training in the park, you never know what can happen at any given moment. Accidents can and will occur. While you may take every precaution, you never know when a small accident can turn into a major injury or even a life threatening incident. It pays to be prepared for all emergencies.

The very nature of what we do, as martial arts instructors, involves a higher than normal risk of injuries, regardless of how good your warm up is, such as:

  • soft tissue injuries due to ballistic nature of movements
  • joint injuries through over extension, or awkward jumping, landing and spinning
  • breaks, fractures as a result of a fall or other impact, such as board breaking
  • concussions or other bleeding due to inadvertant contact during sparring
  • exercise induced breathing difficulties
  • temperature regulation when training in hot conditions
  • sudden cardiac arrest due to intense physical exertion, which ironically, is the major cause of cardiac arrest

These are just the most common occurences, that every school will encounter over time, no matter how well you are prepared.

  1. Being a Black Belt Instructor Is Not Enough

A black belt in itself, is not a qualification, but often it is all that is required to run your own school. Not only does it not guarantee you can teach the skills effectively, even more critically, it does not measure your ability to respond in the event of an injury. If an accident occurs, of course you can call an ambulance. However, no ambulance can ever arrive instantaneously on scene. In fact, response times, on average, are between 7 and 13 minutes, which is a long time depending on the emergency. Every second can be vital in a medical emergency and, as an instructor, you should be the highest trained and qualified person there.

The treatment and first aid you can give in those vital seconds and minutes can make all the difference. As a result, it is recommended that martial arts instructors not only have first aid training but that they also have CPR training included in their first aid course.

  1. Not Everyone Can Apply First Aid

Not everyone at the scene of an accident or medical emergency can apply first aid.  Here are some interesting statistics:

  • 383,000 out of hospital sudden cardiac arrests happen a year
  • 88% of cardiac arrests happen at home
  • Many patients appear health with no known risk factors or heart disease
  • Effective bystander CPR can triple a victim’s chance of survival
  • Only 32% of cardiac arrest victims get CPR from a bystander
  • A quarter of all emergency room visits can be avoided with first aid and a CPR certification

Having the appropriate first aid and CPR training as a martial arts instructor is invaluable to you and your students that you get qualified. By being prepared you can not only help your stduents get skilled and healthier, but also help should any complications arise.

  1. You Might Be Liable For Injury

Liability is a pretty horrible word for most martial arts instructors and organizations. However, if you aren’t keeping your first aid skills up to date then you might be putting yourself at increased risk. If you own your own dojang, run tournaments, personal training sessions, run camps, etc., then you legally need to have the right insurance and you need to be first aid certified. Alternatively, you must have a first aid qualified member of staff who is and is always onsite during training sessions. If an injury occurs, no matter who was at fault, you will be automatically liable if you’re not going about things legally.

Finally, not having completed a first aid course, and keeping your qualifications current, puts you and your clients at unnecessary risk every time you conduct training and puts your reputation at risk. So why risk it when first aid courses are so easy to attend, or arrange for your school ?

  1. First Aid Kits

It is a fantastic idea to have your own personal first aid kit with you on hand. Most dojangs should have their own first aid kits but you can’t always rely on them to be appropriately stocked. So supplement them with your own kit. Quality first aid supplies aren’t that expensive and they allow you to quickly treat basic injuries that commonly occur among out of shape clients.

First Aid kits should be checked and replenished (or replaced) each year. Check the expiration dates on medications and ointments, etc. Keep your kit out of harsh temperatures and environments where possible. Keep a notebook with the medications and ointments, with their expirations listed, so you can replace easily as needed.

The Basic First Aid Kit

A basic first aid kit should include:

  • Adhesive bandages
  • Adhesive tape
  • Antibiotic treatment
  • Antiseptic
  • Breathing barrier
  • Burn dressing
  • Burn treatment
  • Cold pack
  • Eye coverings
  • Eye wash
  • First aid guide
  • Hand sanitizers
  • Medical exam gloves
  • Roller bandage
  • Scissors
  • Sterile pads
  • Trauma pads
  • Triangular bandage
  • Bronchodilator and spacer
  1. But I’ve Already Done a First Aid Course

Having all the right equipment on hand is useless if you don’t have the skills to use it. It is essential for a martial arts instructor to get qualified and learn first aid skills, as is keeping that training refreshed. As we all know, a skill that goes unpractised can become rusty. In fact, the reason CPR training is recommended to be renewed is that there are always advancements in training and in methods of performing both CPR and first aid responses.

Furthermore, first aid training allows a martial arts instructor to spot the small signs that a student is in distress before a small issue turns into a medical emergency.

Organize a First Aid course for your school / association – contact us  to book your group’s session

First Aid Course Options :

Global Fitness Institute is Government authorized to deliver the following First Aid courses Nationally :

HLTAID003 – Provide first aid (a.k.a Level 2 First Aid)

HLTAID006 – Provide advanced first aid (a.k.a Level 3 First Aid)

HLTAID001 – Provide cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)

HLTAID004 Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting

22300VIC – Course in First Aid Management of Anaphylaxis

22282VIC Course in the Management of Asthma Risks and Emergencies in the Workplace

PUAOPE010C  Operate an automated external defibrillator in an emergency

Remember an accident can happen to anyone. So get qualfied and don’t let your skills get rusty because you never know when the next big emergency is just around the corner.

Website sponsored by – Global Fitness Institute

 

Aussie team 2018

Aussie Pride on show in Argentina

Aussie Pride on show in Argentina

Aussie team 2018

Well done to all who represented Australia at the recent ITF World Championships in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

It is one of the toughest cauldrons of ITF competition with a packed stadium full of latino pride and agression. On the mats, we were super proud of the way the Aussie team showed their true spirit and had a red hot crack.

Fair to say all competitors performed very well, and most at or close to their best performance at this level of competition.

Five long days of competition tested the concentration and endurance of our athletes, but they all gave a good account of themselves.

The nature of sports is that it’s not always enough to get a medal, but we are proud to say we did come home with some.

Special Congratulations, of course, goes to our medal winners

  • Lindy Crouch (2 x Gold Medals)
  • Jodi Stanton (2 x Silver Medals)
  • Lee Hermansson (1 x Silver Medal)
  • Sasha Robertson (1 x Bronze Medal)
  • Jackson Riordan (1 x Bronze Medal)

Well done to the coaches Phill Zdybel, Bronnie Keating and Rob Riordan. Your hard work and encouragement in preparing the athletes for their bouts was fantastic.

Thank you to all supporters and parents who came along to cheer on our team.

Check out the Photo Gallery

Well done to Master Neil Cliff and Master Noel Keating, on representing Australia as Umpires.

To round out a very succesful campaign, Master Keating was awarded a Medal of Merit from the ITF for service.

In other big news, Master Michael Muleta was appointed under Secretary General of the International Taekwon-Do Federation at the ITF Congress. (see article)

For all those who did not attend on this occasion, there is always next time.

The next ITF World Championships will be held in Moscow, Russia in 2020.

As per ITF Rules, the INO is charged with co-ordination and management of the national team, from selection trials to team registration, including apparel. From a coaching point of view, we naturally invite coaches from all representative parties.

We will make further announcements regarding squad formation, development camps, coaching and selection trials at the appropriate time.

Affiliations to the INO for 2018 are now open for new and renewing schools.

Affiliate to the ITF National Body

 

itf congress 2018

Master Muleta new under Secretary General of ITF

Master Muleta appointed new under Secretary General of ITF

Master Muleta under secretary general

Master Michael Muleta was recently appointed the new under Secretary General of the International Taekwon-Do Federation at 2018 ITF Congress in Argentina.

Master Muleta, a foundation member of the President Choi Jung Hwa led organization, has filled several executive roles over the past 16 years including:

  • Co-Ordinator of ITF Administration
  • Director of Scientific Research
  • Tournament Committee Member
  • Director of Expansion (Oceana)
  • Director of Umpiring (Oceana)

Additionally, Master Muleta has held the post as President of United ITF Taekwon-Do Australia Inc, the National Body for ITF in Australia since 2002, having founded the organization in 1999.

At various times he has been Technical Director / Adviser for Australia, Sri Lanka, New Zealand and Nepal.

Master Muleta has been involved extensively internationally, having taught seminars in South Africa, Singapore, Hong Kong, Malaysia, USA, Sri Lanka, New Zealand, and across Australia.

He has participated at 13 ITF World Championships since 1994 as a competitor, coach, umpire and official.

He was inducted in the Australasian ITF Hall Of Fame in 2018 by Grandmaster Choi Jung Hwa.

Read his full profile here

7 Simple Reasons for Women’s Self-Defense

7 Simple Reasons for Women’s Self-Defense

womens self defense

Violence against women is a serious and widespread issue in Australia, as well as throughout the world. And while the long term goal is education to stop violence against women, there are actionable strategies women can employ, right now. Here are 7 very simple reasons you should consider taking a women’s self defense class.

1 – Don’t Become a Statistic

Frankly, the statistics in Australia alone are frightening. At least one woman a week is killed by a partner or former partner. One in three women have experienced physical violence. 300,000 women a year experience physical or sexual violence from a stranger. Violence against women contributes to more death, disability and illness to women between 15 and 44 than any other preventable risk factor. Learning self-defense gives you the power to avoid becoming one of these statistics, now.

2 – Prevention and Awareness

As teens and adults we become increasingly fixated on the front and our devices, often being unaware of what’s around us. You work with an experienced instructor to develop strategies that work best for you against a variety of opponents, attacks and situations. Above all, women’s self defense teaches us awareness and prevention.

3 – Take Control for Yourself and Other Women

Women’s self defense is about taking safety into our own hands. Taking a Self defense class is our chance to take action in our own lives, to take control of our own present and future. The fact is, crimes against women happen and will continue to happen. Women’s self defense classes can help prevent us becoming  victims. Knowing how to defend ourselves gives us a better chance of stopping attacks and even lessening attacks against women in the future.

4 – Great Exercise!

Self defense classes, at the end of the day, can also be a great source of exercise, working a range of vital parts of your body. It not only exercises your body physically, it also exercises your mind, reactions and reflexes. It is also an incredible way of exercising your own power and confidence. You do not have to be physically strong to be successful at self-defense. If you can learn to successfully escape or prevent a dangerous situation, then you are exercising good self-defense.

5 – Be Accountable

As women, we are constantly encouraged to be accountable for ourselves. We are told to be accountable for our finances. We are told to account for our stress and encouraged to be accountable for our health, weight and diet, along with our workouts and fitness. It stands to reason that we should be accountable for our self defense. Is it really so hard to add a self defense class to our routine as we would add the latest yoga, pilates or work out fad? However, unlike a fad, this is something that will actually make a monumental, positive change to our lives.

6 – Be Feminine

There is a terrible misconception – unfortunately perpetuated by mass media – that self defense is unfeminine and unattractive. These dangerous articles claim that women who pursue self defense are masculine, “jacked up” and have a distasteful love for violence. However, nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, many models, actresses and even pageant winners are devotees of women’s self defense. Women’s self defense is incredibly feminine because it is empowering. Encouraging women to take self defense is a beautiful, inspiring thing. So, ignore the dangerous misconceptions of mainstream media and enjoy learning self defense.

7 – Do Something Now

Of course we need better education to end violence against women and men. Violence of all kinds is unacceptable. Unfortunately, though, education is long term and may not be able to help you today, tomorrow or even next year. That is why women’s self defense education is important. This is something that can happen now. Women’s self defense provides functional strategies, techniques and training methods to stop an attacker intent on hurting you. It gives you the security and confidence, right now, that you can protect yourself should the need arise. Unfortunately, no matter how well intended, ideologies can’t do that. So until education catches up with reality, keep yourselves safe. Invest in women’s self defense today.

Contact GFI to find out more about our women’s self defense classes and courses. You may consider taking up a structured martial arts class such as Taekwondo, Jiujitsu, Karate or combat sports such as kickboxing, boxing or MMA. Likewise, many providers offer personal training or group sessions / courses for you and and friends or work colleagues.

Muleta Tasmanian Seminar 2

Master Muleta – Tasmanian MMA seminar

Master Muleta – Tasmanian MMA seminar

Muleta Tasmanian Seminar 2

Master Michael Muleta VIIIth degree black belt, provided an insightful and educative workshop for the Tasmanian Martial Arts Council today at the dojang of Southern ITF Taekwon-Do in Hobart, Tasmania. Master Muleta is the owner of Global Fitness Institute and the President of United ITF Taekwon-Do and with over 35 years of experience in Martial Arts, Fitness and Education he brings a depth of knowledge second to none. Today’s seminar was attended by over 30 of Tasmania’s most enthusiastic practitioners from Karate, Ju-Jitsu and Taekwon-Do including many senior ranked Instructors.

Muleta Tasmanian Seminar 3

Master Muleta began his workshop by outlining why it is necessary to learn self-defence techniques and when it is appropriate to use them. Unlike many other self-defence instruction courses he didn’t just focus on a sequence of routines or techniques but looked at when and what techniques are necessary for situations and he then proceeded to, not only show how to perform them, but also how to teach them.
His education background really showed in his presentation methods as well as his knowledge of anatomy and how to apply appropriate tools to vital spots. He draws from his knowledge of several martial arts to bring an interesting perspective to his technique. One of the points he makes is that the knowledge gained through training in different arts should be seen as growing student’s skills rather than replacing one set of skills with another.

Muleta Tasmanian Seminar 5

Although very professional in his presentation, his manner encourages interaction and questions from students of all skill and age levels. He quickly endeared himself to all of the senior instructors and had them helping out throughout the workshop. All in all, this, the first TMAC workshop conducted by a non-Tasmanian Instructor, was a very successful event that was enjoyed by everyone who participated.

Muleta Tasmanian Seminar 1

A long-time friend of Master Steve Weston, there is no question Master Muleta made a large group of new friends this weekend and it is anticipated he will have many more trips to Tasmania both as a martial arts instructor and as trainer of some of the country’s leading fitness coaches.

Muleta Tasmanian Seminar 4

 

Written by Master Steve Weston, for the Tasmanian Martial Arts Council

 

All content, images and text remains property of Thoroughbred Taekwon-do